A Marriage Leaning on Jesus and Longing for Heaven

“When I think about that time I spent with Ian and Larissa, one thing stands out the clearest: their love for one another,” Stefan Green wrote last year in a short update on the couple. “It was beautiful to see Larissa’s devotion and respect for her husband, and Ian’s glad-hearted love for his wife. A lot can change in three years as bodies heal and marriages mature, but their amazing story goes on.”
Over three years ago now, Desiring God shared the story of Ian and Larissa, a couple who chose to keep their promise to marry despite Ian’s traumatic brain injury in 2006. When we published the story, I was single and finishing up my first year of seminary. I was touched by the story at the time and shared it joyfully. I dreamt of finding a wife and entering into of covenant relationship with the woman the Lord had set aside for me.

I had no idea that a few years later I’d be married and working for Desiring God. Ian and Larissa’s story still inspires me, but for different reasons. As a married man, I have more context for the good but hard work that marriage requires. Our circumstances are different, but the requirements are the same.

Their love, devotion, and respect for one another is a fresh reminder that we must look beyond ourselves in order to truly love someone. As I reviewed their story, I was reminded that in order to love and sacrifice, I must cling to the one who first loved and sacrificed on my behalf.

A Marriage Leaning on Jesus and Longing for Heaven

Article by Phillip Holmes Topic: Marriage

“When I think about that time I spent with Ian and Larissa, one thing stands out the clearest: their love for one another,” Stefan Green wrote last year in a short update on the couple. “It was beautiful to see Larissa’s devotion and respect for her husband, and Ian’s glad-hearted love for his wife. A lot can change in three years as bodies heal and marriages mature, but their amazing story goes on.”

Over three years ago now, Desiring God shared the story of Ian and Larissa, a couple who chose to keep their promise to marry despite Ian’s traumatic brain injury in 2006. When we published the story, I was single and finishing up my first year of seminary. I was touched by the story at the time and shared it joyfully. I dreamt of finding a wife and entering into of covenant relationship with the woman the Lord had set aside for me.

I had no idea that a few years later I’d be married and working for Desiring God. Ian and Larissa’s story still inspires me, but for different reasons. As a married man, I have more context for the good but hard work that marriage requires. Our circumstances are different, but the requirements are the same.

Their love, devotion, and respect for one another is a fresh reminder that we must look beyond ourselves in order to truly love someone. As I reviewed their story, I was reminded that in order to love and sacrifice, I must cling to the one who first loved and sacrificed on my behalf.

If you’re not familiar with their story, Ian and Larissa had planned to get married as soon as they graduated from college in December of 2006. But everything was put on hold due to Ian’s accident. Instead of marrying when they were both young and healthy, they married when he was sick and disabled.

“Marrying Ian meant that I was signing on to things that I don’t think I ever would’ve chosen for myself — working my whole life, having a husband who can’t be left alone, managing his caregivers, remembering to get the oil changed, advocating for medical care, balancing checkbooks, and on,” Larissa admitted.“The practical costs felt huge, and those didn’t even touch on the emotional and spiritual battles that I would face.

image

In their twenties, they’ve grown to understand more fully what Paul meant by “sorrowful, yet always rejoicing” (2 Corinthians 6:10). Neither of them would have chosen this type of marriage. She says they made the decision to marry sadly, but joyfully.

Written by Phillip Holmes 
Full story at Desiring God

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