Returning sunspot AR2192, re-numbered AR2209 for its second trip around the sun, has a 'beta-gamma-delta' magnetic field that harbors energy for X-class solar flares. Credit: SDO/HMI
Returning sunspot AR2192, re-numbered AR2209 for its second trip around the sun, has a ‘beta-gamma-delta’ magnetic field that harbors energy for X-class solar flares. Credit: SDO/HMI

Apparently, you can’t keep a good sunspot down. AR2192, the aging sunspot famous for producing six X-flares in late October, is growing again and poses a renewed threat for strong eruptions. In the past 24 hours, the active region has produced a series of increasingly intense M-class flares, culminating in this M5-flare recorded by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.

The impulsive blast, which peaked on Nov. 16th at 1748 UT, caused an HF radio blackout on the daylit side of Earth that lasted some 10s of minutes. Such blackouts are typically noticed by ham radio operators, mariners at sea, and aviators flying polar routes.

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