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(NaturalNews) We are currently in the midst of the sixth mass extinction event in the history of life on Earth, warns an international research team in a new scientific research review published in the journal Science.

The study was conducted by researchers from Stanford University, the University of California-Santa Barbara, Sao Paulo State University in Brazil, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, the Natural Environment Research Council Centre for Ecology and Hydrology in England and University College London.

Throughout the 3.5-billion-year history of life, our planet has gone through several mass extinction events, characterized by dramatic drops in species diversity. Unlike prior mass extinctions, which were caused by factors such as natural climate change or asteroid collisions, the
current mass extinction is caused exclusively by the activity of a single species: human beings.

In the new paper, the researchers refer focus on the severe drop in animal diversity that has occurred as a part of the mass extinction. They have dubbed this dramatic loss of animal life the
“anthropocene defaunation” — that is, the destruction of animal life associated with the era of human domination of the planet.

Cascade of effects

In reviewing the research, the study authors found that more than 320 species of terrestrial vertebrates have gone extinct since the year 1500, and the remaining species have had their populations decline by an average of 25 percent. Among vertebrates as a whole, 16 to 33 percent of all species are considered either threatened or endangered. The rates of decline are highest among larger animals (megafauna), which tend to grow and reproduce more slowly than smaller animals, and need larger areas of habitat to sustain them.

The loss of large vertebrates may have a cascade of ecological effects, the researchers warned. For example, studies found that areas of Kenya where large animals such as zebras, giraffes and elephants have been extirpated quickly became overgrown and experienced a boom in the population of rodents. This led directly to an increase in the rate of certain human diseases.

Written by David Gutierrez
Read more at Natural News

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